Erinn: 24, geoscience student and enthusiast, recovering chemistry major; loves not pants, cradling her phone while she sleeps, cute things and nerdy sentiments (or sediments). Lives and studies in Victoria, BC.

 

Barents Sea in Bloom - NASA’s Earth Observatory
In the chilly waters of the Barents Sea in mid-August 2009, the ocean switched on its carbon dioxide vacuum: a giant bloom of single-celled, plant-like organisms called phytoplankton. During these blooms, which can cover thousands of square kilometers of the surface of the ocean, a liter of seawater may contain a billion or more phytoplankton cells, each one a microscopic chemical factory that vacuums carbon dioxide out of the surrounding seawater and uses photosynthesis to turn it into stored chemical energy. (continued)

Barents Sea in Bloom - NASA’s Earth Observatory

In the chilly waters of the Barents Sea in mid-August 2009, the ocean switched on its carbon dioxide vacuum: a giant bloom of single-celled, plant-like organisms called phytoplankton. During these blooms, which can cover thousands of square kilometers of the surface of the ocean, a liter of seawater may contain a billion or more phytoplankton cells, each one a microscopic chemical factory that vacuums carbon dioxide out of the surrounding seawater and uses photosynthesis to turn it into stored chemical energy. (continued)

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